Category Archives: Encyclopedia

Ringo Starr

Ringo Starr

Ringo Starr (born 1940) is an English drummer, singer, songwriter, and actor best known as the drummer for the Beatles. As a child he was twice afflicted by life-threatening illnesses requiring prolonged hospitalisations. He cofounded his first band in 1957, the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group, and then achieved moderate success with Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. He joined the Beatles in 1962, replacing Pete Best. He sang lead vocals for "With a Little Help from My Friends" and "Yellow Submarine". Starr played key roles in the Beatles’ films and appeared in numerous others. After the band’s break-up in 1970, he released "It Don’t Come Easy", "Photograph" and "Back Off Boogaloo", followed by the 1973 top ten album Ringo. He narrated the first two seasons of the children’s television series Thomas & Friends. Since 1989, he has successfully toured with twelve variations of Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band. In 2011 Rolling Stone readers named Starr the fifth-greatest drummer of all time. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a Beatle in 1988 and for his solo career in 2015. (Full article…)

from

Wikipedia Today’s Featured Article

http://ift.tt/1fWff4y
via techgadgettalk.com

Advertisements

mw-redirect

Sinistar: Unleashed is a 1999 action space shooter video game for Microsoft Windows. It was designed by Marc Michalik and Walter Wright and developed at GameFX, a small studio composed of former members of Looking Glass Studios. Originally titled Out of the Void, the project at first had no relationship to Sinistar, which was released by Williams in 1982. After licensing the franchise from Midway Games, GameFX developed the game as a sequel. The player’s goal in both installments is to use starships, weapons and power-ups to destroy the Sinistar, a large bio-mechanical machine. Unlike its predecessor, the sequel has full three-dimensional graphics and gameplay. Sinistar: Unleashed got a mixed reception when released: some critics lauded its graphics and new features, and several journalists felt that it stayed true to the feel of the original game, but other critics faulted the boss characters and repetitiveness of the gameplay. (Full article…)

from

Wikipedia Today’s Featured Article

http://ift.tt/1Ha6Kkd
via techgadgettalk.com

Unas

The black basalt sarcophagus of Unas in the funerary chamber of his pyramid

Unas was an Ancient Egyptian pharaoh, the ninth and last ruler of the Fifth Dynasty during the Old Kingdom period. He succeeded Djedkare Isesi, who might have been his father, and reigned for 15 to 30 years in the mid 24th century BC. During this time Egypt maintained trade relations with the Levantine coast and Nubia, and may have launched a military campaign in southern Canaan. A period of declining royal power and decentralization of administrative functions continued under him, ultimately contributing to the collapse of the Old Kingdom some 200 years later. Unas built a pyramid in Saqqara, the smallest of the royal pyramids completed during the Old Kingdom. The accompanying mortuary complex with its high and valley temples linked by a 750 m (2,460 ft) causeway was lavishly decorated with painted reliefs, whose quality and variety surpass the usual royal iconography. His burial chambers were the first with the Pyramid Texts carved and painted on the walls, meant to help the king reach the afterlife by identifying him with Ra and Osiris. (Full article…)

from

Wikipedia Today’s Featured Article

http://ift.tt/1I5VMxi
via techgadgettalk.com

United States Bicentennial coinage

Eisenhower dollar

The United States Bicentennial coins are commemorative versions of the Washington quarter, Kennedy half dollar and Eisenhower dollar (pictured). They bear the double date 1776–1976, though some were struck in 1975 as well as 1976. The US Mint had opposed issuing commemorative coins since the 1950s, but beginning in 1971, members of Congress introduced bills authorizing coins to honor the Bicentennial. New legislation required the temporary redesign of the reverse of the quarter, half dollar and dollar; a nationwide competition yielded designs of a Colonial drummer for the quarter, Independence Hall for the half dollar, and the Liberty Bell superimposed against the moon for the dollar. The coins that circulated were in copper nickel, and so many were struck that they remain common today. Congress also mandated that 45,000,000 part-silver pieces be available for collectors; the Mint sold over half before withdrawing them from sale in 1986 and melting the remainder. (Full article…)

Part of the United States Bicentennial coinage series, one of Wikipedia’s featured topics.

from

Wikipedia Today’s Featured Article

http://ift.tt/1UjEIte
via techgadgettalk.com

Pinniped

Male and female sea lion

Pinnipeds, including true seals, walruses, and sea lions and fur seals, are a widely distributed and diverse clade of semiaquatic marine mammals. There are 33 living species, and more than 50 extinct species have been described from fossils. They have streamlined bodies and four limbs that have evolved into flippers. Males typically mate with more than one female, and the females raise the pups, often born in the spring and summer months. Pinnipeds generally prefer colder waters and spend most of their time in the water, but come ashore to mate, give birth, molt or escape from predators such as sharks and killer whales. Humans have hunted seals since at least the Stone Age, and commercial sealing had a devastating effect on some species from the introduction of firearms through the 1960s. Populations have also been reduced or displaced by accidental trapping and marine pollution. All pinniped species are now afforded some protections under international law. (Full article…)

from

Wikipedia Today’s Featured Article

http://ift.tt/1JGDi6i
via techgadgettalk.com

Air raids on Japan

B-29 Superfortress bombers dropping incendiary bombs on Yokohama in May 1945

Air raids on Japan by the Allies in World War II caused extensive destruction and casualties; the most commonly cited estimates are 333,000 killed and 473,000 wounded. During the first years of the Pacific War, these attacks were limited to the Doolittle Raid in April 1942 and small-scale raids on military positions in the Kuril Islands starting in mid-1943. Strategic bombing raids began in June 1944 and were greatly expanded in November. The raids initially attempted to target industrial facilities, but from March 1945 onwards were generally directed against urban areas. Aircraft flying from aircraft carriers and the Ryukyu Islands also frequently struck targets in Japan during 1945 in preparation for an Allied invasion planned for October. In early August, the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were struck and mostly destroyed by atomic bombs. Japan’s military and civil defenses were not capable of protecting the country, and the Allied forces generally suffered few losses. The bombing campaign was one of the main factors in the Japanese government’s decision to surrender in mid-August 1945. Nevertheless, there has been a long-running debate over the attacks on Japanese cities, and the decision to use atomic weapons has been particularly controversial. (Full article…)

from

Wikipedia Today’s Featured Article

http://ift.tt/1u1x7oR
via techgadgettalk.com

Jarome Iginla

Jarome Iginla

Jarome Iginla is a Canadian professional ice hockey player and an alternate captain for the Colorado Avalanche in the National Hockey League (NHL). He was a longtime member and former captain of the Calgary Flames and also played for the Pittsburgh Penguins and Boston Bruins before joining the Avalanche in 2014. In 2001–02 he led the NHL in goals and points and won the Lester B. Pearson Award as its most valuable player as voted by the players. In 2003–04 Iginla led the league in goals for the second time and captained the Flames to the Stanley Cup Finals, leading the league in playoff scoring. A six-time NHL All-Star, he is the Flames’ all-time leader in goals, points, and games played, and is second in assists to Al MacInnis. Iginla twice scored 50 goals in a season and is one of seven players in NHL history to score 30 goals in 11 consecutive seasons. He has scored 589 goals and 1,226 points in his career. Internationally, he represented Canada‘s championship teams at the 1996 World Junior and 1997 World Championships as well as the 2004 World Cup of Hockey. He is a two-time Olympic gold medal winner, including at the 2002 Winter Olympics, where he helped lead Canada to its first Olympic hockey championship in 50 years. (Full article…)

from

Wikipedia Today’s Featured Article

http://ift.tt/1v6h86L
via techgadgettalk.com